Bills glossary

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1R (first reading) -

A bill is presented (introduced) to the House by the minister, parliamentary secretary or member. The bill is read a first time and printed, with the explanatory note and becomes a public document. After the first reading, the member introducing the bill (known as the 'mover') makes a speech outlining the principles of the bill (the second reading speech). Debate is then adjourned, for at least five days.


1st Print (first print) -

The term 'First Print' appears on the top right hand corner of a bill and indicates that this is the first version introduced into the Parliament (see 'Print version of a bill').


2nd Print (second print) -

A 'Second Print' denotes that this bill has been amended by the originating House at the Consideration in Detail Stage (LA)/ Committee of the Whole Stage (LC). A second print is produced for use in the other House (see also 'Print version of a bill').


2R (second reading) -

During the second reading debate, members express their opinions about the principles of the bill. At the conclusion of the debate, a vote is taken on the question ¨that this bill be now read a second time". If the House agrees, the bill proceeds to either the consideration in detail stage (LA)/ committee stage (LC) (if there are amendments to be considered) or directly to the third reading stage (LA) or with the concurrence or previous agreement of the House (LC). If the House disagrees, then the bill is defeated.


3R (third reading) -

After the bill has passed the second reading or the consideration in detail stage (LA)/ committee stage (LC), a vote is taken on the question "that this bill be now read a third time". If this is agreed to, the bill has passed all stages. The bill is sent, with a message, to the other House for consideration. After the bill has been read a third time by the other House, it is either sent to the Governor for assent or returned, with amendments, to the House of origin (see Consideration in Detail (LA)/ Consideration in the Committee of the Whole (LC)).


3rd Print (third print) -

A 'Third Print' denotes that this bill has been amended for a second time by the originating House, prior to its consideration by the other House. A third print is then produced for use in the other House (see also 'Print version of a bill').


Act (of Parliament) -

A Bill which has passed all three readings in each House of Parliament, received Royal Assent and become law.


Amendment -

A proposed alteration to a bill or act.


Assented -

An assented bill is one that has passed both Houses and has been signed by the Governor. When assented to, a bill becomes an act. In certain circumstances under ss. 5A and 5B of the Constitution Act, the Governor may give assent to a bill that has not passed the Legislative Council.


Awaiting assent -

The bill has passed both Houses and is awaiting consideration by the Governor.


Awaiting Minister's/mover's 2R speech -

The bill has been introduced and read a first time, but the Minister or mover has not yet made the second reading speech.


Bill -

A proposed law. After a bill passes both Houses of Parliament and receives assent, it becomes an act.


Cognate bills -

Cognate bills are bills which are related to each other in terms of subject matter and are presented to the Parliament as a package for simultaneous consideration. They can, however, be considered separately at any stage.


Commencement -

An act comes into force 28 days after it is assent to, or on a day or days to be appointed by proclamation. A clause, stating whether the act comes into force by assent or proclamation, usually appears at the beginning of each bill.


When an act or clauses of an act come into force by proclamation, this date is determined by the minister who, on behalf of the Governor, places a notification in the Government Gazette shortly before the date of commencement. The Government is required to lodge notification with the Parliament of all legislation remaining unproclaimed after 90 days.


Consideration in committee of the whole - (LC specific)

If a member wishes to amend a bill, the House forms itself into a "committee of the whole" to deal with the bill in detail. During this stage the Presiding Officer leaves the Chair . The Chairman of Committees presides over the committee and, at the end of this stage, reports the bill to the Presiding Officer with or without amendments. The bill then proceeds to the third reading stage, unless a motion is agreed to that the bill be recommitted for further consideration. The committee of the whole also considers bills that have been returned from the other House with amendments. If the committee agrees to those amendments, the bill is sent to the Governor for assent. If, however, the committee disagrees, both Houses exchange messages until agreement is reached or the bill is set aside.
• See 'Consideration in detail' for procedure in the LA.


Consideration in detail – (LA specific)

If a member wishes to amend a bill, the House will consider the bill in detail. During this stage the Presiding Officer takes a seat at the Table next to the Clerk. After all amendments have been considered by the House and agreed to or otherwise a motion is moved "that this bill be now read a third time." The bill is then passed or a motion is moved for further consideration. The House also considers bills in detail that have been returned from the other House with amendments. If the House agrees to those amendments, the bill is sent to the Governor for assent. If, however, the House disagrees, both Houses exchange messages until agreement is reached or the bill is set aside.
• See 'Consideration in committee of the whole' for procedure in the LC.

Debate adjourned -

Debate on a bill can be adjourned until a later hour of the day or a future day. Debate on a bill that has just been introduced must be adjourned after the mover's second reading speech. In the LA bills must be adjourned for five clear days, which is five calendar days not including the day the bill is introduced. In the LC bills must be adjourned for five calendar days. However, a bill can be declared urgent or Standing Orders suspended to allow it to proceed.


Debate interrupted -

Debate on a bill can be interrupted by other business during a member's speech. That member continues his speech when debate on the bill is resumed.


Discharged -

The order of the day for consideration of a bill can be be removed from the Business Paper by resolution of the House.


Explanatory notes -

The Explanatory Note is attached to the First Print of a bill and provides an explanation about the purpose of the bill.


First print -

The term 'First Print' appears on the top right hand corner of a bill and indicates that this is the version introduced into the Parliament by the minister or private member (see 'Print version of a bill').


House of review -

The term 'House of review' is often used to refer to an Upper House in a bicameral system. As a convention, members of one House use the phrase 'the other House' when referring to the other Chamber.


Lapsed on prorogation -

Prorogation by the Governor brings an end to a session of the Parliament and all notices of motions and orders of the day listed on the Business/Notice Paper lapse. If the House agrees, lapsed notices and orders (including bills) may be restored to the Business/Notice Paper in the new session at the stage they had previously reached.


Money Bills -

Bills setting a tax or proposing the spending of money for a particular purpose.. Money bills must be introduced into the Legislative Assembly. There are two broad types of money bills: appropriation bills and taxation bills.


Negatived -

A bill is negatived when a vote "that this bill be now read a second (or third) time" is lost. In the LA, the House may also resolve, during the second reading stage, that a bill be disposed of.


Notice of motion -

A bill is initiated after a minister or private member gives a notice of motion to introduce a bill. The notice of motion includes the short and long title of the bill.


Passed by both Houses -

The passing of a bill through both Houses means that all stages have been completed and the bill agreed to by both Houses. A hard copy of the bill is not available until after assent, however, a 'Passed by both Houses' PDF version, incorporating any amendments, is available on the Parliament's website shortly after it has been agreed to.


Print version of a bill -

A bill is introduced into the Parliament as a 'First Print'. If that bill is amended by the originating House, a 'Second Print' (or 'Third Print' if necessary) is produced in both hard copy and PDF format for consideration by the other House. Where a bill is amended by the other House, a revised print is not issued but a Schedule of Amendments is sent to the originating House for its consideration. Once both Houses have agreed to a bill, a 'Vellum' is produced for the Governor's signature and a 'Passed by both Houses' (PDF) version is available on the website.


Private bill -

A private bill (not to be confused with a private members public bill) deals with specific private matters which affect a private person or body . Unlike public bills which are initiated by a notice of motion, a private bill requires the publication of a notice in the Government Gazette followed, after a period of three months, by the lodgement of a petition accompanied by a copy of the proposed bill. After completion of the first reading stage, the bill is referred to a select committee for consideration. The bill is then returned to the originating House for consideration, and if passed in the usual way, is presented to the Governor for assent.


Private member's public bill -

Public bills may be introduced by a Minister or a private member.Bills introduced by private members are considered by the Parliament during the time set aside for consideration of general business. The process for considering a private members' bill is the same as that for a government bill.


Proforma bill -

A proforma bill is a bill introduced at the start of each new Parliament. The bill (usually the Law of Evidence Bill) is read a first time but does not proceed to the second or third reading stage.


Public bill -

A public bill is a bill which deals with a matter or matters of general public interest. Public bills may, except for money bills, be introduced into either House by a minister, a parliamentary secretary on behalf of the minister or a private member. Bills introduced by ministers or parliamentary secretaries are considered during the time allocated for Government Business. Bills introduced by private members are considered during General Business.


Recommittal - (LC specific)

At the conclusion of the committee stage, or on a motion that a bill be read a third time, a member may move that the bill be recommitted, in whole or part, for further consideration.
• See 'Reconsideration' for procedure in the LA.


Reconsideration – (LA specific)

At the conclusion of the consideration in detail stage, on the motion "that this bill be now read a third time", a member may move that the bill be reconsidered, in whole or part.
• See 'Recommittal' for procedure in the LC.


Regulations -

See 'Statutory instruments'.


Restored by resolution -

A bill which has lapsed or which was referred to a committee may be restored to its place on the Business Paper by resolution of the House.


Schedule of amendments -

Where a bill is amended by the other House, the House sends a schedule of amendments back to the originating House for its consideration. The originating House considers the amendments during the consideration in detail stage (LA) or forms itself into a committee of the whole to consider those amendments (LC). If the amendments are agreed to, the bill has been passed by both Houses and is sent to the Governor for assent. If the amendments are not agreed to by the originating House, the bill, with a message outlining the reasons for disagreement, is returned to the other House for further consideration. Both Houses exchange messages until agreement is reached on the amendments or the bill is set aside.


Second print -

A 'Second Print' denotes that this bill has been amended by the originating House at the consideration in detail stage (LA)/ committee of the whole stage (LC). A second print is produced for use in the other House (see also Print version of a bill).


Statutory instruments -

Statutory instruments are regulations, by-laws, ordinances, rules of the court or proclamations made under certain Acts. Statutory instruments are published in the NSW Government Gazette and a notice providing details of the instrument is then tabled in both Houses of the Parliament. Statutory instruments are not debated in the Parliament unless a member of either House seeks to disallow part or all of that instrument.


S.O. suspended -

Standing orders can be suspended by the House to allow a bill to proceed through all its stages in one sitting.



The other House -

As a convention, members of one House use the phrase ´the other House' when referring to the other Chamber.


Third Print -

A 'Third Print' denotes that this bill has been amended for a second time by the originating House, prior to its consideration by the other House. A third print is then produced for use in the other House (see also Print version of a bill).


To be reported -

When a bill has passed all stages in the originating House it is forwarded to the other House together with a message requesting concurrence with the bill. However, until such time as the Presiding Officer or Chair announces receipt of the message and the bill is introduced andread a first time or set down for consideration at a later hour, that bill remains "to be reported".


Vellum -

A copy of a bill as passed by both Houses, which is printed on 'vellum' paper and presented to the Governor for signature. Under s. 50 of the Constitution Act 1902, the vellum must be transmitted to and enrolled and recorded in the office of the Registrar-General within 10 days from the day on which the bill becomes law.


Withdrawn -

A member may, without debate, withdraw a notice of motion standing in his/her name from the Business Paper or move a motion that an order of the day be discharged and the bill withdrawn.